18
December , 2014
Thursday

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By Orrin Hudson, Founder of Be Someone


Police Brutality

Nationwide (BlackNews.com) — Police brutality is alive and well, and the story is always the same. White cop kills unarmed Black man, and the grand jury fails to indict him. The problem is discussed over and over again, but people rarely talk about the solutions.

Here are 10 ways for police officers and us as citizens to best deal with the issue of police brutality:

#1 – Have Faith: People may not be fair, but God is just and fair and we must trust in him (Vengeance is mine said the Lord…) Many people are religious, but tend to forget their religion when they are facing injustice. The Bible, Quran, and most other religious books encourage peace, faith and trust in a higher being.

#2 – Take the Non-Lethal Approach: Police departments around the country need to start taking the non-lethal approach to non-lethal situations. Alternatives such as mace and tasers, just to name a few. If you think violence is an answer, then think again! We must become peaceful if we want peace. What you want you must give.

#3 – Be More Sensitive: Police departments must also better provide sensitivity training. All should be treated with respect and dignity. We can choose to understand from a new perspective. Change your mind and change the result. See with eyes of love and understanding rather than with fear, doubt and anger. Know that when you hurt others, you are also hurting you and yours.

#4 – Think Kenny Rogers: All of us need to apply the Kenny Rogers philosophy which says “you got to know when to hold em’, know when to fold em, know when to walk away and when to run.” We need to know that we have choices, and our thoughts and actions return/reflect back to each of us in kind.

#5 – Encourage Youth To Respect Authority: Many police brutality cases often start because of young ones being disrepectful to those who are in authority. There needs to be a long conversation with the youth about respect and courtesy. Respect is a choice and a value. When we understand the value of what we are choosing, we will choose trust and wisdom. We must teach such values to our children and to each other!

#6 – Love Your Neighbor: Love thy neighbors as you love yourself, and remember this also implies and intends that one love one’s self. This means that we need to discern the difference between our fearful ego and our true self.

#7 – Stop Blaming Others: We need to stop blaming others for our actions, and pull out a mirror and take responsibility for ourselves. We also need to walk in love, and like mother Teresa said “focus on the positive”. Yes! Stop in your tracks and think again! Change your mind. See with new eyes. Put the situation in a new light; the light of love. When faced with a situation, ask yourself, “what would LOVE do now?

#8 – Consider the Price: Fighting and unnecessary violence is too big of a price to pay. Someone always ends up dead, and the family members are left to suffer. Power is never what it appears to be in the world. Spirit is power in love.

#9 – Think Non-Violent: This especially applies to police officers. Be cool and calm, and live in the present; It is the true gift. Martin Luther King Jr. said, “Either non-violent or non-existent”. Listen to the wise, they have changed themselves. Their words and actions still ring true!

#10 – Stop Being Controlled By The Media: Stop letting the media propaganda control your actions thoughts and feelings. Be aware and discern what is true, loving and wise. Wrong is wrong, and right is right. Base your opinion on that!

Orrin Hudson is the founder of Be Someone, a non-profit organization in Atlanta, GA, that uses the game of chess to teach inner-city children how to make better decisions in life. For more details, visit www.BeSomeone.org


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